The Turbulence Between Changing Worlds

For most people on Planet Earth, physical reality, linear time, and the messages of media and rational science, are all anyone should need to live a good and worthwhile life. However, there are a growing number of people who feel that this is not the way things really are and that the illusion of reality, although very convincing, is not the only experience we have access to.

Although I have researched and explored what some might call ‘the spiritual alternatives’ to mainstream living for most of my life, it has only been recently that I have really started to ‘walk my talk’, so-to-speak. This isn’t to say that I wasn’t following values personal to me before this time, just that my understanding has now deepened.

The start of the spiritual journey tends to follow this pattern:

Something sounds interesting – let me take a look – let me try it… while I’m still doing what I usually do.

The next stage is to develop an intellectual understanding. You know it makes sense but you have difficulty proving it in your own life. The problem is you lack the necessary faith to progress – what if you are wrong about what you think you know?


Taking the leap of faith requires moving out of your usual ‘comfort zones’. It also requires that you do this whole-heartedly. The problem we create for our selves is that the overwhelming evidence showing up in our regular physical experience convinces us that our new spiritual course of action is misguided and not to be completely trusted. As the saying goes:

“Trust in Allah, but tie your Camel.”

What most people are missing at this stage, is a recognition of the part they play in creating the reality they experience; taking 100% responsibility for all personal thought, emotion, and action. To help you to understand this, consider too that the physical world you experience is like a hard-light reflection of all that you project out from within your being. Put another way, what you experience in your physical life is only feedback from your conscious creating. Once you begin to accept this willingly, you become more mindful, both of what you think and what you express – to your self and to others.

At this point, you may have let go of the fence and suddenly found yourself standing on the other side of where you were before. However, it is still within reach and offers the possibility of climbing back. On the other hand, if you continue to travel further from the security and familiarity of the fence, you start to feel like this:


A few months after having that feeling, Lynda posted a Seth quote which I have added to a visual scene:


I also noticed that a few of my friends were experiencing varying degrees of the same realisation – that they also were no longer in their old familiar places, yet had not reached the places they wanted to experience! This got me thinking about the transition from one state of being to another. As you leave the world you know, and enter unfamiliar territory, you pass through what I describe as ‘turbulence’ – where aspects of each world ‘interferes’ in the present. 

However, you must now keep going, despite some noticeable features of this part of your journey. These can include losing old friends and gaining new ones; various disruptions in finances and living arrangements; feelings of loss and depression as well as relief and enthusiasm.